Sergey Ivanov...look deeper...
The Sergey Ivanov tumblr blog goes to Helsinki!

Hey everyone, I’ve moved for Helsinki in search of Sergey Borisovich’s personnel archive card. 

In other news, I’m also more busy than ever settling down, working on a course on Russian economics, and buckling down for Finnish winter. Which, ironically, means that I barely have time for updating tumblr.  

Maybe some interested followers can help everyone else keep up-to-date on Sergey Borisovich? Just ask if you’re keen.

generationputin:

Sergei Ivanov’s personal archive card can be found from the Foreign Ministry’s files on former diplomats stationed in Helsinki. It reports that he arrived in Finland in November 1984 and left in August 1990. 
The Sergey Ivanov tumblr blog goes to Helsinki! Hey everyone, I’ve moved for Helsinki in search of Sergey Borisovich’s personnel archive card. In other news, I’m also more busy than ever settling down, working on a course on Russian economics, and buckling down for Finnish winter. Which, ironically, means that I barely have time for updating tumblr. Maybe some interested followers can help everyone else keep up-to-date on Sergey Borisovich? Just ask if you’re keen.

generationputin:

Sergei Ivanov’s personal archive card can be found from the Foreign Ministry’s files on former diplomats stationed in Helsinki. It reports that he arrived in Finland in November 1984 and left in August 1990. 

meanboysfromkremlin:

elvira watch the fuck out

meanboysfromkremlin:

elvira watch the fuck out

meanboysfromkremlin:

sergei ivanov’s crib here

(via State institutions

Meeting of the Council for Coordination with Religious Organisations

April 24, 2014, 17:50  The Kremlin, Moscow

Meeting of the Council for Coordination with Religious Organisations.
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Full caption
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office
Chief of Staff of the Presidential Executive Office Sergei Ivanov held a meeting of the Council for Coordination with Religious Organisations.

The meeting examined the role religious organisations play in preserving the spiritual and cultural identities of Russia’s peoples and their contribution to implementing state policy for migrants’ adaptation.

Religious organisations in Russia play an active part today in various civil society institutions and are partners for the authorities in tackling important social and other tasks. Mr Ivanov noted that this dialogue and partnership are especially needed today when the entire world faces serious risks and problems such as rising interethnic intolerance, erosion and devaluation of traditional values, and a retreat of clear moral and ethical references.

Mr Ivanov said in his remarks that Russia’s spiritual leaders have always been consistent in supporting a united country and society that bring together people of different ethnic groups and faiths. Russia’s religious organisations have made a big contribution to promoting Russian culture and traditional moral values both at home and abroad. They have considerable influence, including influence among fellow faithful in the migrant communities in Russia. This could help the authorities be more efficient in their efforts to help migrants adapt to Russia’s cultural, values, language and legal space.

The meeting participants noted that this sort of work is already underway. In particular, the Federal Migration Service’s regional offices have signed 129 agreements on integration cooperation with religious organisations: 80 with Orthodox organisations, 42 with Muslim organisations, 3 with Buddhist organisations, 2 with Jewish organisations, and 2 with Armenian Apostolic Church organisations. Religious organisations have also opened 37 classes for migrants, 31 organised by the Russian Orthodox Church, and 6 by Muslim spiritual organisations.

The meeting approved a number of concrete decisions on facilitating religious organisations’ efforts to preserve the spiritual and cultural identities of Russia’s peoples and help migrants to adapt to life in Russia.

April 24, 2014, 17:50The Kremlin, Moscow

(via State institutions

Meeting of the Council for Coordination with Religious Organisations

April 24, 2014, 17:50 The Kremlin, Moscow

Meeting of the Council for Coordination with Religious Organisations.
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Full caption
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office
Chief of Staff of the Presidential Executive Office Sergei Ivanov held a meeting of the Council for Coordination with Religious Organisations.

The meeting examined the role religious organisations play in preserving the spiritual and cultural identities of Russia’s peoples and their contribution to implementing state policy for migrants’ adaptation.

Religious organisations in Russia play an active part today in various civil society institutions and are partners for the authorities in tackling important social and other tasks. Mr Ivanov noted that this dialogue and partnership are especially needed today when the entire world faces serious risks and problems such as rising interethnic intolerance, erosion and devaluation of traditional values, and a retreat of clear moral and ethical references.

Mr Ivanov said in his remarks that Russia’s spiritual leaders have always been consistent in supporting a united country and society that bring together people of different ethnic groups and faiths. Russia’s religious organisations have made a big contribution to promoting Russian culture and traditional moral values both at home and abroad. They have considerable influence, including influence among fellow faithful in the migrant communities in Russia. This could help the authorities be more efficient in their efforts to help migrants adapt to Russia’s cultural, values, language and legal space.

The meeting participants noted that this sort of work is already underway. In particular, the Federal Migration Service’s regional offices have signed 129 agreements on integration cooperation with religious organisations: 80 with Orthodox organisations, 42 with Muslim organisations, 3 with Buddhist organisations, 2 with Jewish organisations, and 2 with Armenian Apostolic Church organisations. Religious organisations have also opened 37 classes for migrants, 31 organised by the Russian Orthodox Church, and 6 by Muslim spiritual organisations.

The meeting approved a number of concrete decisions on facilitating religious organisations’ efforts to preserve the spiritual and cultural identities of Russia’s peoples and help migrants to adapt to life in Russia.

April 24, 2014, 17:50The Kremlin, Moscow

http://eng.state.kremlin.ru/face/7069

International Navigation Forum

April 23, 2014, 13:00 Moscow


Chief of Staff of the Presidential Executive Office Sergei Ivanov at the NAVITECH-2014 exhibition.
1/4 Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Full caption
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office
Chief of Staff of the Presidential Executive Office Sergei Ivanov took part in the 8th International Navigation Forum at the Moscow Expocentre and also visited the NAVITECH-2014 exhibition.

The forum’s main aim is to inform the broader Russian and foreign audience about the situation in and plans for developing satellite navigation systems, state policy regarding commercial use of the GLONASS system, innovation technology and the latest navigation equipment.

Addressing the event, Mr Ivanov said that Russia is now able to meet its own satellite navigation needs. The GLONASS system is fully deployed with an orbital group of 28 satellites, 24 of which are in routine operation. The GLONASS signal can be picked up in every corner of the planet. More satellites will be added to the group to replace existing ones as needed.

Mr Ivanov also said that Russia will continue to develop international cooperation in satellite navigation. In particular, Russia will support its specialists’ participation in international organisations that formulate standards and recommendations for ensuring mutual compatibility between Russian navigation systems and other systems, and on improving the quality and reliability of navigation services.

The earth-based measurement component of the GLONASS system abroad will eventually include 50 stations in 36 countries. This will make the system more competitive and guarantee more stable and precise operation. Only two such stations are currently in operation: one in Antarctica and one in Brazil.

Mr Ivanov noted that emergency and rescue services are already making active use of the GLONASS system. The system is also used for monitoring passenger and freight traffic, in land registration and law enforcement work.

At the NAVITECH-2014 exhibition, Mr Ivanov looked in particular at the multifunctional technology used by the personal satellite communications system Gonets. This system, based on satellites in low orbit, can provide communications services and cover parts of Russia not covered by the mobile telecommunications providers. Mr Ivanov saw a demonstration of a Gonets terminal, which transfers communication from the mobile system to the satellite system if the user leaves the mobile coverage area. An inbuilt GLONASS/GPS receiver identifies the user’s location. The Gonets system is also compatible with the ERA-GLONASS equipment used for emergency response in road accidents.

The ERA-GLONASS system is currently in trial operation.

“We hope that ERA-GLONASS will be in industrial operation as from next year, and not just in Russia but also in the other Customs Union countries,” Mr Ivanov said.

Mr Ivanov noted that Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan have agreed to establish a common navigation space.

April 23, 2014, 13:00Moscow